During The New Jersey Divorce Process, What Should I Expect If I Am Deposed?

A deposition is an important part of the divorce process. It is used to determine the extent of an individual’s assets so the court can fairly and effectively divide a couple’s property during the divorce process. Going through a deposition is called being deposed. Although it might sound like a scary or uncomfortable process, it is a vital part of your divorce and will only be used to gather information to fairly distribute your shared property with your spouse. If you have any questions about circumstances particular to your situation and how they might play out in a deposition, talk to your divorce attorney.

Expect an Interview

In a lot of ways, a deposition is like a job interview. You dress professionally and answer questions about your finances and your marriage clearly and concisely. The individual who performs your deposition is your spouse’s attorney.

Examples of questions you might face during your deposition include:

  • “How much money did you make last year?”

  • “Would you consider yourself or your spouse to be your child’s primary caretaker?”

  • “Do you and your spouse have shared or separate bank accounts?”

  • “What is your relationship like with your child?”

Do not give more information than you are asked to provide. Simply answer the questions and give clarification for your answers only if you are asked to provide it.

Do not feel pressured to rush through the deposition. Take your time, think about your answers, and ask your spouse’s attorney for clarification of his or her questions if you feel you need it. The deposition is done to ensure that your divorce settlement is fair, not to punish you or your spouse. Do not use this as an opportunity to speak badly of your spouse and do not, under any circumstance, attempt to lie or conceal important information from the attorney performing the deposition. You will be found out and it will have a negative impact on your case.

Work with a New Jersey Divorce Attorney

Being asked to complete a deposition can make your divorce seem more difficult, but it is actually done to make the process easier for the court to complete. If you have been asked to complete a deposition, discuss the request with your attorney so you can better prepare yourself for the questions you will face. Contact The Law Office of Eric B. Hannum Esq., LLC. today to begin working with an experienced New Jersey divorce attorney. Our firm proudly serves clients throughout Mercer, Monmouth, Burlington, Middlesex, and Ocean counties. Let us serve you and make your divorce as painless as possible.

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